Baton

Photography Carl Warner

Photography Carl Warner

Photography Carl Warner

Photography Carl Warner

Photography Carl Warner

Photography Carl Warner

Photography Carl Warner

Photography Carl Warner

Registration number
4466
Item name
Baton 
Category
Bodywear
Sculpture/Carving
 
Indigenous name
hauanoreereo (Are'are' language); fou`atoleeleo (Kwaio language) 
Maker
Unrecorded  
Associated cultural group
 
Place
Pacific > Solomon Islands > Malaita Province > Malaita Island
Map
Collector
Mr William Effey 
Acquisition date
April 22, 1950 
Acquisition method
Donated by Mr William Stephens 
Raw material
Wood; shell, nautilis; lawyer cane (Calamus sp.); beads, glass; putty nut (Parinarium sp.)
Dimensions
H: 400 mm W: 35 mm L: D: 35 mm Circum:

Description

Cylindrical wood baton with round head; red-dyed lawyer cane plaited and woven around shaft below head; shaft inlaid with putty nut and small rectangular pieces of nautilus mother-of-pearl. A string of white and blue beads are looped around lower end of baton.

Research notes

From the UQ Anthropology Museum exhibition ‘Solomon Islands: Re-enchantment and the Colonial Shadow’, a scholarly project curated by Diana Young in collaboration with research consultants Graham Baines, Annie Ross, Clive Moore and David Akin, August 2016 – June 2017.

Originally registered as a neck pendant because they were worn hanging from the back of the neck. Fou'atoleleo or stone-and-pearl were worn by men who had killed and were displayed with great pride during ceremonies for reward killing. By the beginning of the twentieth century, even after reward killing had been abolished by the government, fou'atoleleo were made especially for European visitors as curios. The stone-and-pearl were particularly well known by the Spanish, whose early explorers falsely believed they were made of gold. The Are'are people in south Malaita used pyrite for the stone heads also known as fool's gold [Burt, Akin & Kwa'ioloa 2009].

William Effey was an Australian businessman in Queensland who owned Rowes Cafe in Brisbane and was a shareholder of Hivo Plantations Ltd, which operated a copra plantation in Haevo, Santa Isabel from around 1913 to 1936. Although Effey did not live in Haevo he collected many items through his contacts during his visits possibly up until the 1940's [Effey source file]. Some of his collection that was donated to the Anthropology Museum appear to be from Malaita, not Isabel, based on stylistic features or because the item was not known outside Malaita, such as this baton. This could be explained by the high proportion of Malaitan men who worked in the copra plantations on Isabel during this time [Golden, 1993; Baines, pers. comms. 09/10/2012].

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