Slit drum

Photography Carl Warner

Photography Carl Warner

Photography Carl Warner

Photography Carl Warner

Photography Carl Warner

Photography Carl Warner

Photography Carl Warner

Registration number
40679
Item name
Slit drum 
Category
Sound
 
Indigenous name
galamit takop (Lihir language) 
Maker
Nathaniel Sasbiah and Barth Saien  
Associated cultural group
 
Place
Pacific > Papua New Guinea > New Ireland Province > Lihir Island Group > Kosmaiun, Aniolam Island
Map
Collector
Lihir Cultural Heritage Association (LCHA) 
Acquisition date
August 01, 2013 
Acquisition method
Donated by Lihir Cultural Heritage Association (LCHA) and Lihir Mining Area Landowners Association (LMALA) 
Raw material
wood; acrylic paint
Dimensions
H: 450 mm W: 1590 mm L: D: 470 mm Circum:

Description

Slit drum carved from a log; body is hollowed out and has a narrow rectangular slit along the top; two cylindrical handles extend from each end. The entire drum is painted: the circumference at each end of the body is painted red with white dots and curvilinear designs; the centre of the body is white with coloured curvilinear and triangle designs; one side has 'Lihir Island' painted in black. The handles are are painted in blue, red, green and white bands with a black, yellow, red and white design on each end. Registration number 40679 marked with tag.

Research notes

From the UQ Anthropology Museum exhibition 'Musical Landscapes of Lihir' March - August 2013, curated by Dr Kirsty Gillespie and the Lihir Cultural Heritage Association with Dr Diana Young. The making of these Lihir performance items was commissioned in by LCHA for display in this exhibition.

Exhibition label: Nathaniel Sasbiah, painted by Barth Saien, c. 2011. Galamit takop / slit gong canoe. The slit gong is commonly known as a log drum, however this is technically incorrect, since a drum by definition has a membrane. One model represents the turtle [displayed with this galamit], and the other is identified as canoe-like as the handles are said to resemble a canoe prow. Some of the decorations represent the designs of the biar, while the end of each handle represents a kepkep / men’s chest ornament from Lihir.

The cane stick or buos (40680) is used to beat the galamit.

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