Slit drum

Photography Carl Warner

Photography Carl Warner

Photography Carl Warner

Photography Carl Warner

Photography Carl Warner

Photography Carl Warner

Photography Carl Warner

Photography Carl Warner

Photography Carl Warner

Photography Carl Warner

Photography Carl Warner

Photography Carl Warner

Photography Carl Warner

Registration number
7007
Item name
Slit drum 
Category
Sound
 
Indigenous name
 
Maker
Unrecorded  
Associated cultural group
 
Place
Pacific > Papua New Guinea > East Sepik Province > Wosera Gaui District > Kanganaman village
Map
Collector
Mr Des Bartlett 
Acquisition date
January 01, 1954 
Acquisition method
Purchased from Mr Des Bartlett 
Raw material
wood, clay, ochre, shell
Dimensions
H: 280 mm W: 1100 mm L: D: 220 mm Circum:

Description

Slit gong drum 7007, known as a garamut, is roughly rectangular in shape. The main body is overall 29cm long, 10.75cm high and 8cm wide; with carved projections at either end. It has a hollowed out centre to form a resonance chamber 22.5 cm long, 3.5cm wide, and 7.5cm deep. The main body of the drum is decorated with red ochre, with white and blue / grey ochre also used for decoration. One side of the drum is decorated with a stylised face in white ochre with overly accentuated ears, and a suggestion of decoration about the eyes, nose and mouth. The other side is decorated with white stylised swirling motifs. In the centre is an inverted, blue drop of water.

On one end of the drum is a carved dog's head 7cm long and 3cm wide; and on the other a human head, 8.5cm long and 3cm wide. Both are coloured blue and white. The human head faces upwards, and is predominantly blue with white around the eyes and mouth. The lips are red, and the eye sockets are decorated with shell. The dog's head is blue on its sides with white about the eyes; with a white band down the centre of the head, branching out to cover the entire nose and muzzle, and with a white band around the neck (Jim Lockhart 2000).

Research notes

The garamut was made c. 1950. "Small garumet is not ordinarily used but the Luluai (headman) might have a small gaumet. This specimen was made especially to be filmed. The garumet stick knocks out a message. The garument is well made and tuned." [Winterbotham's notes from Bartlett].

From the UQ Anthropology Museum exhibition 'Double Up: Pasifika Treasures from the UQ Anthropology Museum' curated by Diana Young with Jane Willcock, 5 February - 9 April 2010.

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