Slit drum

Photography Carl Warner

Photography Carl Warner

Photography Carl Warner

Photography Carl Warner

Photography Carl Warner

Photography Carl Warner

Photography Carl Warner

Photography Carl Warner

Photography Carl Warner

Photography Carl Warner

Registration number
40650
Item name
Slit drum 
Category
Sound
 
Indigenous name
lumbung, garamut (Tok Pisin) 
Maker
carvers: Philip Apa, Paul Kuri, Teddy Tamone, Willie Kawang and Arnold Jongtai  
Associated cultural group
Kainmbat clan 
Place
Pacific > Papua New Guinea > Madang Province > Bogia District > Kayan village
Map
Collector
 
Acquisition date
June 03, 2013 
Acquisition method
Donated by Mr Alphonse Aime 
Raw material
New Guinea teak (Vitex sp.); acrylic paint; sago leaves; plastic
Dimensions
H: 450 mm W: 1700 mm L: D: 400 mm Circum:

Description

Carved wood garamut hollowed out with narrow rectangular slit cut along the top; curvilinear design carved on most of surface; figure carved at each end. The garamut is painted mostly red; carved design infilled with white and black; adorned with tassels of sago leaf fibre dyed green, yellow, purple and pink; and white strips of plastic tied to pink plaited sago leaf fibre, which hangs across both sides of the garamut.

Research notes

This garamut/slit-drum carved in 2012 comes from Kayan village of Bogia District of Madang Province Papua New Guinea. It is named Yoberber after the name of the design used which belongs to the Kainmbat clan of Kayan social group. It was carved from a New Guinea teak (in Tok Pisin, diwai garamut). The design was lost and luckily found in the Berlin Museum in Germany by Alexis Posser, a German anthropologist. He photographed the design together with the garamut and brought the photos to the village. Philip Apa, one of the Kainmbat clan leaders, kept the photos under his custody. It is from these photographs that Philip resurrected the design by carving it onto this garamut with the help of Paul Kuri who carved the figurines (tumbuan face) which also appear in mask form.

The two garamut stands [40652 and 40653] are also carved from a garamut tree and the carved image is called Kangai (spirit), a tambaran of the clan. The garamut stick [40651] was cut from a hard rope or creeper that climbs trees which people use to make garamut sticks. The women made the decorations from young sago leaves fibre which, were dipped in hot boiling water that had been prepared with different color dyes bought from the store. They also used shredded strips of white plastic rice bags. Paints used on the garamut are also store paints. The colors red, black, and white, are the main popular traditional colors among the Kayan [Alphonse Aime, 2013].

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